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South African study using J&J vaccine will resume

South African study using J&J vaccine will resume

SOUTH African researchers will tomorrow resume a study further evaluating the efficacy of Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine in the field, after it was temporarily suspended along with use of the shot in the United States. U.S. regulators recommended pausing the use of the single-shot earlier this month due to extremely rare cases of blood clots but on Friday said the United States could restart vaccinations. Europe's drug regulator has backed its overall benefits against any risk. The Sisonke study is being carried out by the National Department of Health, South African Medical Research Council and Johnson & Johnson among…
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SA to resume J&J vaccination study

SA to resume J&J vaccination study

SOUTH African researchers hope to next week resume a study using Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine to immunise healthcare workers, one of the scientists leading the programme said yesterday. South Africa suspended the study last week after U.S. federal health agencies recommended pausing the use of J&J's vaccine because of rare cases of blood clots. "We do hope to start again next week," South African Medical Research Council President Glenda Gray, co-principal investigator of the Sisonke study, said during a webinar on Wednesday. So far around 290,000 health workers have been given J&J's vaccine in the study, which is further…
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South African researchers are looking at medicinal plants for possible COVID-19 treatments

South African researchers are looking at medicinal plants for possible COVID-19 treatments

SOUTH Africa has a long tradition of using plants for medicinal purposes. Some of these, such as Aloe ferox, Sutherlandia frutescens and Kiggelaria africana, have been studied as sources of useful compounds. But most still need to be scientifically validated as treatments for particular diseases. DEPIKA DWARKA, Post doctoral Fellow, Durban University of Technology Medicinal plants are gradually gaining prominence in scientists’ search for potential treatment agents for COVID-19. Currently, there is no specific antiviral drug to treat this new respiratory disease. Most treatment strategies focus on managing symptoms and supportive therapy such as supplementary oxygen and mechanical ventilation. My…
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As African penguin population dwindles, researchers plan new colony

As African penguin population dwindles, researchers plan new colony

WENDELL ROELF SOUTH African researchers plan to release scores of abandoned, hand-reared African penguin chicks at the Western Cape's De Hoop nature reserve, boosting efforts to start a new breeding colony of the seabirds at risk of extinction. The only penguin that breeds in Africa, it was once South Africa's most abundant seabird. But the population plunged to around 13,000 breeding pairs last year, from more than 1 million pairs in the 1920s, when their eggs started to be harvested for human consumption, government data shows. Researchers have since January 2019 deployed dummy penguins that emit the distinctive call of…
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